What Went Wrong? Turning Acquisition Failure into Success

“We did an acquisition about 15 years ago. It did not go well…I guess you could say we are still ‘recovering,’ the CEO of a family-owned business recently shared with me during a meeting.

She went on to explain there were a number of integration issues and other challenges that cropped up post-closing that the company was not prepared to handle. From payroll issues to disgruntled employees to operational challenges – the experience was “traumatic,” for the organization according to the CEO.

Fortunately, the company is in a better place today and is ready to explore new ways to grow. While leadership recognizes the potential of a strategic acquisition, because of their previous experience, they are, understandably, hesitant.

It’s not uncommon to have this reaction. But just because an acquisition didn’t work in the past, it doesn’t mean you have to abandon M&A as a tool for growth. You can learn from what went wrong last time and be successful when executing future deals.

There are many reasons deals fail from culture clashes, hidden liabilities, poor planning, or simply inadequate of expertise, but these issues point to one overarching reason for acquisition failure – lack of strategy. Alarmingly, many companies take on a reactive approach to acquisitions, buying whatever company comes their way without first developing a strategic plan. Not having a plan is a surefire way to fail.

In the case of our family-owned business, they decided to take on a strategic approach to M&A this time around. Unlike last time, where they adopted a “plan as you” approach to M&A, they dedicated serious resources to establishing a strategic plan for acquisition prior to even looking at companies. This included identifying potential integration challenges and developing a 100-day post-closing plan long before the deal closed to avoid the same issues as last time. With a firm foundation the company was able to identify the right opportunities for growth and execute a successful transaction.

If you are still suffering from the results of a failed acquisition, I encourage you to adopt a strategic approach right now. Gather your team together to review your growth options in light of your overall strategic vision. Then, you can determine your next steps whether its organic growth, external growth, minimizing costs, exiting a business, or doing nothing. With a strategy in place, you will avoid many pitfalls and maximize your chances for success.

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