It seems like 2017 will be a strong year for acquisitions. A new report highlights a number of factors that could drive activity this year including the record levels of cash held by private equity firms and a favorable lending environment for borrowers.

Potential changes to U.S. tax policy under the new administration could reduce the corporate tax rate and encourage companies to repatriate offshore cash to invest in acquisitions.

2016 was a year full of uncertainty, from Brexit to the U.S. presidential elections, but as the economic and political landscape stabilizes, business leaders are regaining their confidence. 80% of executives surveyed predict M&A activity will increase in 2017. These market conditions may be the right recipe for increased acquisitions, especially for companies facing poor organic growth prospects.

In the first quarter alone, a number of significant transactions have been announced including the owner of Burger King and Tim Horton’s acquiring Popeyes, Mars acquiring pet hospital company VCA, and Intel pushing into the self-driving car space by purchasing Mobileye. These deals will likely spur additional acquisitions as key players react to changing industry dynamics and competition.

While we don’t know if M&A in 2017 will match 2015’s record level, we can certainly expect an uptick in activity for the remainder of the year.

Photo credit: Igor Trepeshchenok / Barn Images 

There’s a myth that acquisitions are only executed by huge, publicly-traded, Fortune 500 companies, but that’s simply not the true. In reality, there are many acquisitions conducted by small and middle market firms that are private transactions and are not reported to the media.

There are many reasons to consider acquisitions, regardless of the size of your business. A smaller, highly focused acquisition can grow your company and be incredibly profitable. In fact, small transactions allow you to execute your strategy covertly and avoid alerting your competition to your growth strategy. With a small, strategic acquisition there is less of a risk of integration issues and acquisition failure because the deal is not transformative for the organization. At the same time, a small, strategic acquisition can fulfill a targeted growth need and positively impact a company’s long-term growth.

Another reason people don’t consider acquisitions is because they think they are too expensive. While acquisitions do require a significant amount of financial resources to execute, the cost of organic growth or doing nothing may be higher than the cost of M&A. When looking at the bigger picture, it may be more expensive to develop a new product on your own or take too much time. Companies often use acquisitions to move quickly and implement a ready-made solution. If you are concerned about cost, keep in mind there are ways to mitigate the price of a deal. Only you can determine if acquiring or building your own solution is best, but you should consider both options simultaneously.

Whether or not you decide to grow through external or organic growth, you should consider both as tools, regardless of the size of your company. For every company, unintentionally falling into the trap of doing nothing is dangerous. Innovation, either from external growth or through in-house development, is key to long-term success. Think about companies that lost their edge do to failure to innovate. Blockbuster didn’t adapt from DVD to streaming and lost out to Netflix and Redbox and the once dominant BlackBerry, which failed to compete with iPhone. The cost of unintentionally doing nothing can mean your services and products become obsolete, so make sure you consider your next steps with the future in mind.

Photo credit: Barnimages.com via Flickr cc

Does this sound familiar? You want to grow through acquisitions, but there are no good companies to acquire. While it may seem like there are absolutely zero acquisition prospects, usually that is not the case.

Many companies struggle to find acquisition prospects because they are focusing on only on industry partners, suppliers, or competitors they already have a relationship with. We call these companies the “usual suspects.” There’s nothing wrong with looking at the “usual suspects” for acquisition opportunities, but if you find you are hearing the same company names over and over again without getting any results, it may be time to try a new approach.

Here are four more ways to find quality acquisition prospects in addition the “usual suspects”:

  1. Market Research – In researching the market you will naturally uncover a few potential acquisition prospects. You will also have the advantage of gaining a deeper understanding of the market which will help you select the best companies to acquire, evaluate potential acquisition candidates, and negotiate with owners.
  2. Trade Shows / Associations – Both are an excellent source for finding many companies in your desired industry in a short amount of time. Walk the floor of a trade show and you’ll see dozens of companies all in one location and many trade associations also member companies listed on their website.
  3. Internal Input – Use the resources you already have. Your sales team is filled with folks who have their ear to the ground and are up-to-date on key players and new developments in the industry.
  4. For-sale Companies – Looking at for-sale companies is never a bad place to start your search. Just make sure you don’t limit yourself by only considering these opportunities. Including not-for-sale companies in your search will increase your chances for a successful acquisition. Remember, every company is for sale, for the right equation.

For more tips on finding companies to acquire join our webinar Building a Robust Pipeline of Acquisition Prospects on March 23.

After this webinar you will be able to:

  • Approach the search for the right acquisition prospect systematically
  • Understand effective research methods for identifying prospects
  • Develop criteria for your ideal acquisition prospect
  • Use tools for objective decision-making during the acquisition process

Building a Robust Pipeline of Acquisition Prospects

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Time: 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST

CPE credit is available.

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Not finding the right company to acquire is the top challenge for middle market companies seeking to grow through mergers and acquisitions. According to Capstone’s survey of middle market executives, 28% noted lack of suitable companies as the strongest reason for not considering acquisitions as a tool for growth.

Finding the right company to acquire is critical to the success of a deal, especially for strategic acquirers who plan to hold onto the newly acquired business long-term.

The lack of targets may be because most leaders are only focusing on for-sale companies. Many wrongly assume that if an owner is not actively seeking a buyer, a there is no chance for a deal. This is simply not the case. Once you begin to consider not-for-sale acquisitions, the universe of options expands.

Pursuing not for-sale acquisitions allows you to take charge of your acquisition strategy and seek out the best companies to acquire rather than accepting whatever opportunity happens to come your way.

For many I realize the idea of pursuing not-for-sale deals can be intimidating, and many assume that if an owner is not actively selling their company that there is no chance for acquisition. This is simply not true. While searching for and approaching companies that aren’t seeking buyers requires a different approach, and more effort, than reacting to whatever happens to be for sale, there are some tricks to approaching these owners.

Finding an Owner’s “Hot Buttons”

One of these best practices is to find the owner’s “hot buttons” to determine what the right equation will be for them to consider selling. A “hot button” is any issue an owner would insist on addressing if they were to sell the company. Price might be one such “hot button” but it’s unlikely to be the only one. The owner may love his or her work, in which holding a position after the acquisition would be a priority. There may be a succession issue if the owner has family members in the company they want to take care of. The owner could have longstanding ties to the community—or may even be the biggest employer in town—and would want to ensure the business stays in the area.

Being informed about these “hot button” issues, and handling them sensitively, opens up the whole field of so-called “not-for-sale” companies.  Now, as you develop your acquisition strategy, you have far more choices, and much better chance of finding the company that truly matches your over-riding strategic goal.

Because approaching “not-for-sale” owners takes great skill, it often it makes sense to hire a third party expert who has experience in this work and is not perceived as any kind of competitive threat by the owner.  Your acquisition advisor can also help you tease out the precise equation that would prompt the owner to sell.

For more insights on middle market M&A, download our report State of Middle Market M&A 2017.

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Capstone Strategic’s survey of middle market executives shows most see the same (43%) or growing (31%) M&A activity in their industry. 47% are pursuing M&A in order to access new markets.

Capstone Strategic, the leading M&A advisory firm for the middle market, surveyed middle market executives from multiple industries on their growth and M&A experience in 2016 and their outlook for 2017. The survey was conducted in December 2016 and followed previous annual surveys of the middle market.

M&A activity across the board is mostly seen as the same (43%) or growing (31%).

Looking forward, our respondents are evenly split on whether or not they will pursue M&A in 2017. 35% are less than 50% likely to execute acquisitions and 35% are more than 50% likely. The top driver for pursuing M&A this year is access to new markets (47%).

As for obstacles to M&A, time and attention demanded by the process is the top barrier to pursuing acquisitions in 2017 (25%) while the most common reason for not considering M&A as a tool for growth is lack of appropriate target companies (28%).

The overall growth picture is improving. Those reporting modest growth rose from 58% in 2015 to 67% in 2016 and those reporting high growth grew from 11% in 2015 to 13% in 2016. Those reporting contraction shrunk from 9% in 2015 to 5% in 2016.

The business environment is seen by most in a positive light, with the majority reporting the same (50%) or an improved (35%) environment for growth. Compared to 2015, fewer executives saw a worsening environment for growth (8% compared to 13%).

Capstone’s CEO David Braun said: “The survey confirmed that 2016 remained an active year for middle market mergers and acquisitions and looking ahead, we believe we’ll see begin to see a renewed interest in M&A activity due to pent up demand and supply in the marketplace. 2017 presents a unique opportunity for companies that decide to execute strategic acquisitions.”

The full survey, State of Middle Market M&A 2017, can be viewed by clicking here.

 Feature Photo credit: dan Chmill via Flickr cc

Global M&A reached $3.7 trillion in 2016, dropping 16%, and the number of deals increased slightly by 1% when compared to last year. While 2016 did not match 2015’s record-levels, activity was still robust. Compared to 2014, activity increased by 5%.

Activity in the fourth quarter reached $1.2 trillion with 13,504 deals announced, a 50% increase in deal value and 18% increase in the number of deals when compared to 3Q 2016. This year, there were a number of interesting deals to note, including the AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner transactionVerizon’s deal with Yahoo, and GE Oil and Gas combining with Baker Hughes.

Click on the infographic for a closer look at M&A in 2016.

M&A Update Year End 2016 - Capstone Infographic

Middle market M&A rose in October and dealmakers expect robust activity for the remainder of 2016, according to a survey by Mergers & Acquisitions. Survey participants expect more companies will be inclined to execute deals once the uncertainty of the U.S. presidential election has passed.

Overall M&A in 2016 has dropped significantly when compared to 2015 activity. US M&A value for the first nine months dropped from $1.53 trillion in 2015 to $1.07 trillion in 2016 (-30%) and the number of deals dropped from 9,028 to 8,103 (-10%), according to Thomson Reuters.

However, middle market M&A has remained relatively stable. For the first nine months of 2016 US middle market M&A value decreased just 3.5% from $155 billion to $145 billion and the number of deals decreased from 7,565 in 2015 to 6,935 in 2016 (-8.3%), according to Thomson Reuters.

As I previously discussed on this blog, now may be an ideal time for middle market companies to execute strategic mergers and acquisitions. While mega-deals are slowing down and large corporations shedding non-core business lines, there are many opportunities for middle market companies to take action. External growth, which includes joint venture, minority interest, majority interest and 100% acquisition may help your company grow for years to come.

Are you ready for M&A? Take the Acquisition Readiness Assessment now for free.

Fill out the form below to access take the assessment online.

 

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Middle market companies have faced many challenges to growth, but the tide is now turning. Previously, we had observed the dumbbell effect, where at either end of the spectrum massive corporations and small businesses flourished while middle market companies were caught in between. Unlike large multinational corporations, many middle market companies cannot leverage the same economies of scale to deal with price cuts, consolidation, and regulatory challenges. On the other hand, middle market companies do not have the same flexibility as startups to move swiftly in the market.

The Dumbbell Effect

The Dumbbell Effect: Massive corporations and small businesses flourish at either end of the spectrum, while the middle market is squeezed in between.

 

Corporations Sell Non-core Businesses

While this environment was challenging, it also created a unique opportunity for those who could seize opportunity and fill the void. Now the market has shifted and instead of consolidating, many large corporations are shedding non-core businesses in order to focus on fast-growing, profitable business units. P&G is in the process of selling 105 brands to refocus on 10 fast-growing category-based business units. Recently P&G sold Duracell to Berkshire Hathaway, various hair care brands including Pert, Shamtu and Blendax to Germany’s Henkel, and its fragrance, color cosmetics and hair color business to Coty.

Growth Through Strategic Acquisitions

Divestments by large corporations can generate opportunities for middle market companies looking to grow rapidly through M&A. With acquisition, middle market companies have the opportunity to quickly execute their growth strategy, whether it’s by adding a new product or service, acquiring a competitor, or expanding into a new geographic or vertical market. Overall, middle market M&A has remained relatively stable when compared to global values, suggesting that although mega-deals may be slowing down, smaller, strategic acquisitions are still being executed. Now is the time to carefully consider your opportunities and execute your growth strategy.

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After hitting record-high levels in 2015, global M&A activity dropped significantly in the first half of 2016. It was the slowest first six month period for global mergers and acquisitions in the past two years. The value of deals decreased from $2.03 trillion to $1.65 trillion (19%) while the number of deals decreased from 22,153 to 21,087 (5%). While overall activity declined, deals announced in the second quarter of 2016 increased by 24% when compared to the first quarter. The downturn in value has been attributed to fewer mega deals (deals over $5 billion).

Global middle market M&A (deals under $500 million) remained relatively stable compared to overall activity. Deal value and volume fell by just 6% and 2%, respectively.

Looking to the future, uncertainty hampers M&A activity. Dealmakers cited concerns about “Brexit,” the U.K.’s vote to leave the European Union and the upcoming U.S. presidential election in November.

Deals in the News

M&A update 1H 2016 Infographic

Monsanto has rejected Bayer’s all-cash $62 billion bid, but says it is open to negotiations. A combination of Bayer and Monsanto would create the largest seed and pesticide business globally with $67 billion in sales. While you may not be creating an agricultural behemoth with your acquisition, there are a few lessons we can learn from this transaction, regardless of size.

M&A Will Affect You…How You Respond Is Your Choice

One of the reasons Bayer wants to acquire Monsanto is because of consolidation in the agriculture industry. Last year chemical giants Dow Chemical and DuPont agreed to a deal that will combine their agriculture businesses. Earlier this year Syngenta, a Swiss pesticide maker, agreed to be sold for $43 billion to China National Chemical Corporation.

When acquisitions occur in your industry, they affect you whether or not you decide to pursue M&A. A major acquisition by a key player may change the market environment and industry dynamics and you’ll need to find ways to adapt to these changes. This may mean changing your approach to customers, developing a new product, or pursuing strategic acquisitions yourself. Whatever you decide to do, remaining static and maintaining “business as usual” is not the best path to success.

Price Isn’t Everything

The Bayer – Monsanto deal is a publicly traded transaction and so it must be reported in the news and to investors. With all the media surrounding the deal, all the information is available to not just the public, but Bayer’s competitors. It’s interesting that Monsanto has rejected Bayer’s offer as “incomplete and financially inadequate,” but is open to further discussions. In other words, Monsanto believes the offer is too low and would like a higher price.

In contrast to large publicly traded companies, privately held firms execute acquisitions a bit differently. First, there is no need to announce each acquisition to the public. This allows you to fly under the radar and keep your strategic plans hidden from competitors. It also may help you to avoid price wars and auctions where you are competing against other bidders.

Of course, price is an important aspect of any deal, but it is not the only important factor. Especially in the world of privately held, not-for-sale acquisitions, there are many non-financial factors that can (and will) convince an owner to sell. Finding out what motivates an owner and communicating the strategic alignment of the deal are critical.

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Middle market deal activity reached its lowest level since 2009, according to Mergers & Acquisitions. This may be a result of concerns about the upcoming U.S. presidential election and because banks are shying away from lending to private equity-backed deals.

While middle market M&A activity is down, when compared to 2015 levels, the middle market as a whole is actually leading the U.S. economy in revenue and job creation. According to the Middle Market Indicator, the middle market grew at a rate of 6.3% over the past twelve month while the S&P 500 growth rate was -3.4%. The projected twelve month growth rate is 4.6% for the middle market.

So how should an owner or executive see this paradox? In a word: opportunity. With continued strength in the middle market, but a decline in deals, you have the chance to move more freely than when M&A is hot.

If other companies are paralyzed by uncertainty, you should be emboldened. Seize the opening to pursue transactions while competition is reduced.

M&A can be the best way to own the future, by claiming new market share, adding new technologies, enriching your brand, or expanding your human resources.

But where to begin?

Your first step is to review your current market and identify predictors for future demand. What are your customers buying today? What will they need tomorrow? You probably have an approximate idea but now is the time to conduct thorough research, so you can spot the gaps that your company could fill.

The next step is to consider how strategic acquisition could position you to meet future needs faster than organic growth.

Especially if you have a strong balance sheet, right now is an exceptionally opportune time to accelerate your growth through mergers and acquisitions. So make a plan, and then act.

Capstone’s survey of middle market executives shows 53% likely to pursue mergers and acquisitions in 2016 compared to 41% when last surveyed.

Capstone surveyed middle market executives from multiple industries on their growth and M&A experience in 2015 and their outlook for 2016. The survey was conducted in December 2015, and followed a previous survey in 2014.

Respondents gave a mixed picture of growth for their industries in 2015. More respondents saw extremes in their industries. Those reporting high growth grew from 4% in 2014 to 11% in 2015, while those reporting contraction grew from 2% in 2014 to 9% in 2015. Between these two poles, most respondents were seeing modest growth in their industries during 2015 (58%).

How likely is it that your company will pursue some form of M&A or external growth in 2016?

How likely is it that your company will pursue some form of M&A or external growth in 2016?

The environment for growth in 2015 was seen by most in a positive light, with the majority reporting the same (46%) or an improved (36%) environment.
M&A activity across the board in 2015 was mostly seen as the same (36%) or growing (33%) when compared to 2014.

Looking forward to the coming year, companies showed a stronger inclination to engage in M&A, compared to predictions when we last asked this question in 2014 (53% certain or likely, compared to 41%).

When asked about their growth goals, respondents were evenly split between “selling current products in new markets” (40%), “creating and selling new products in current markets” (36%), and “increasing sale of current products in current markets” (38%). (Some respondents were pursuing more than one goal).

As for barriers to engaging in M&A, these were largely internal, with respondents citing “lack of resources” (33%) as a primary reason not to pursue transactions.

Capstone’s CEO David Braun said: “This survey confirms what we ourselves observed, that 2015 was an active year for middle market M&A and 2016 is likely to prove an even stronger year. We see a growing polarization between growth-focused companies and those that are sitting on the sidelines. While many companies are still holding cash, more players are emboldened to expand through external growth. This includes acquisitions but also minority ownership deals, joint ventures and strategic alliances. When growth stagnates, M&A can often provide the fastest path forward. When growth is high, companies should seize the opportunity to plan for further expansion.”

The full survey, State of Middle Market M&A, can be viewed by clicking here.

In light of recent FTC rulings against market domination, Sysco has changed its M&A strategy to focus on smaller, strategic deals rather than large transformative deals. Although Sysco’s change is motivated by regulatory obstacles to larger acquisitions, using strategic, smaller deals is an excellent approach from a strategic perspective. We have long recommended that our clients pursue a series of small transactions to achieve their long-term growth goals. We call this strategy taking “frequent small bites of the apple” because it’s much easier to eat an apple one bite at a time than to cram the whole fruit into your mouth!

Among the advantages of pursuing a series of smaller deals:

1. Focus on One Reason

You may have many needs to meet before you reach your long-term growth goals, for instance improving talent and technological capabilities and expanding geographically. If your vision is growing into a worldwide paint manufacturer and distributor, but you only have manufacturing operations on the East Coast, you will need to expand geographically, build your distribution networks, and perhaps improve on your manufacturing capabilities. Doing all this with only one company may dilute your efforts, or you might acquire a company that really doesn’t fulfill any of your strategic needs.  A better approach: first focus on acquiring a company with an excellent distribution network in the U.S and then another company with quality manufacturing capabilities that match your acquisition criteria. Once you’ve adjusted to this change, you might look at acquisitions outside the U.S.

2. Stay Below the Radar

Large transactions draw attention, especially the mega-deals valued at over $5 billion that have boosted M&A value to record levels. But many transactions are much smaller than these multi-billion dollar deals; in the U.S. from November 1, 2014 to October 31, 2015 there were 12,663 M&A transactions, according to Factset data. 95% of these deals were under $500 million or undisclosed. (Undisclosed deals are typically privately held, smaller transactions that are too small for financial reporting). Smaller strategic transactions allow you to make moves below the radar, out of sight of your competition.

4 reasons why smaller acquisitions are better

3. Adjust to Integration Challenges More Easily

Even the most carefully planned acquisition encounters integration challenges as people and systems adjust to the newly merged company. By acquiring a smaller company, you dramatically limit your integration challenges. Once you’ve had time to work out any kinks and make sure your new company is operating smoothly, you can begin pursuing the next acquisition.

4. Minimize Risk of Acquisition Failure

Although acquisitions are inherently a risky undertaking, smaller strategic transactions are much less risky than large transformative deals. Because integration challenges are minimized, you can remain focused on your strategic objectives, increasing your chances of realizing synergies from the deal. There’s also less financial risk associated with smaller acquisitions; you can minimize capital outlays while rapidly growing your company to reach your long-term goals.

Executing a series of strategic acquisitions is a proven way for middle market companies to grow.

A small deal is also ideal for first-time acquirers who have never pursued growth through mergers and acquisitions. All in all, smaller acquisitions allow you to remain focused, move covertly in the market, and increase your chances of success while still rapidly moving you closer to your vision for the future.

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Instead of investing in growth, companies this year have been holding more than $1.4 trillion in cash – close to a record $1.65 trillion in 2014. Oracle’s $56 billion cash stockpile is 1.5 times its sales and Cisco’s $60 billion in cash is 1.2 times its sales. Eleven companies have cash reserves double their annual revenue.

And it’s not just Fortune 500 companies. According to the Middle Market Center, more middle market firms plan to hold onto cash in 2016. Fewer of them are willing to invest extra money or plan to expand in 2016.

Have U.S. Companies Stopped Investing In Growth?

Companies that stockpile cash don’t invest in stock buybacks and dividends, research and development, other organic growth initiatives or mergers and acquisitions.  A strong balance sheet is important, but the levels of cash held by nonfinancial S&P 500 companies is astounding!  They may be worried about the economy or the upcoming elections. But there’s another possibility: all that money on the sidelines portends robust M&A activity in 2016.

Tax Savings

Publicly traded companies also are stashing profits offshore to avoid paying taxes on them. The U.S. corporate tax rate is one of the highest in the world and tax inversions in particular are being driven by the pursuit of tax savings rather than for strategic reasons. .

The latest example is Pfizer and Allergan’s proposed merger which would relocate the company to Ireland and away from the U.S. corporate tax rate. Other companies that have done this include Chiquita, Perrigo, Medtronic, Endo, and Actavis despite calls for stronger restrictions on tax inversions by Congress and President Obama. Pfizer already has found ways to save on taxes even without the acquisition. The company has designated $74 billion as “indefinitely’ invested abroad.

Invest in Growth Now

As other companies hold onto cash, you have a unique opportunity now to invest in your future. Do this by developing a long-term strategic plan, investing in new products, services or equipment, or growing organically. Or pursue the faster, more powerful vehicle of strategic mergers and acquisitions. Middle market companies can seek privately held, not-for-sale deals that focus on long-term growth rather than on cost savings or short-term quarterly updates with shareholders. This increases the likelihood of a successful transaction and sustainable growth.

Middle market companies cannot afford to dwell on cost savings and sit idle. Make sure you are thinking about long-term growth and how your company will not only survive, but thrive.

Is your company hoarding too much cash? Or are you investing in future growth?

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As we near the end of the fourth quarter, everyone is wondering what will happen in 2016. Will the frenzied M&A activity of 2015 continue into the new year?

There seem to be mixed reviews on what activity will look like next year. The Intralinks deal flow predictor indicates a 7% increase in global M&A in Q1 2016, but Mergers & Acquisitions Magazine has been citing a downward trend in the middle market for the past few months.

On the other hand, on a recent Deal Webcast “2016 Middle Market Outlook,” dealmakers were a bit more hopeful, expecting to see activity continue due to the high levels of dry powder and capital on the sidelines, while they did admit there may be a slight downturn.

The lending environment will be similar in 2016 to what it was in 2015 and in the middle market private equity will continue to be highly competitive, according to Michael Fanelli of RSM.

Healthcare and Technology Will Dominate

The Affordable Care Act brought about widespread changes to the healthcare industry, spurring a wave of mega-mergers by massive pharmaceutical companies. Despite this wave of mega-deals, for the most part much of the uncertainty surrounding ACA seems to have worked its way out of the middle-market companies. Tim Alexander of Harris Williams says that by and large, healthcare has become less of a due diligence item for dealmakers, especially those in the upper middle market.

On the other hand, in the lower middle market, the ACA may still raise some red flags, especially for businesses with part-time employees or ones that don’t have healthcare plans at all. While some sellers may have thought about the impacts of ACA, many are waiting to begin talks with a buyer before engaging professionals to deal with these issues, according to Fanelli.

The focus on healthcare is not only due to changes brought about from the Affordable Care Act, but is also indicative of a larger health and wellness trend we’re seeing in the U.S. Expect shakeups in the consumer and food and beverage spaces as people focus on healthier, organic specialty products.

As for technology, there’s plenty of disruption that will continue over the next one to two years, with a constant flow of innovative startups. This continuing trend will have its own impact on the middle market.

The U.S. Middle Market Remains Strong

For the most part, all three dealmakers agreed that middle market M&A is much stronger in the U.S. than it is cross-border or internationally. Most investors see the U.S. as the locale where they can expect their highest returns. This regional focus is not unique to the middle market: In the first 9 months of 2015, the U.S. accounted for 47% of global M&A transactions ($1.5 trillion).

Engaging with Sellers Remains Critical

When it comes to deal-making, building a connection with the owner and sharing your strategic vision remain the critical starting points. There are numerous reasons why an owner may decide to go with a financial buyer over a strategic buyer, even though technically strategic buyers should have an advantage from a cash perspective. In our experience, the same has been true (less money for strategic acquisition vs. financial). What it comes down to is really understanding the owner’s priorities and what he or she wants out of an acquisition. Hint: It’s not always more money.

As Marc Utay of Clarion Capital Partners said, echoing one of our key principles: “Price is important, but not the most important thing. It [the company] is like a child to them.”

 

M&A activity in the first 9 months of 2015 remained strong reaching $3.2 trillion globally. It was the strongest first 9-month period since 2007 for global mergers and acquisitions.

The trend of large, mega deals continued in the third quarter of 2015.  Global deal value increased by 32% in the first 9 months of 2015 when compared to the same time period in 2014. On the other hand, deal volume remained relatively flat, only increasing by 2.3%. The average deal size was $103 million, a 30% increase from 2014.

In the US, there were $1.5 trillion in the first nine months of 2015, a 46% increase in value when compared to the first 9 months of 2014.  Click on our infographic for more insights on M&A activity in 3Q 2015.

M&A update 3Q 2015

 

Feature Photo Credit: Mark Dixon via Flickr cc

If you’re reading this post, you’ve probably noticed the Successful Acquisitions Blog has a new look. You can still find the latest on middle-market M&A at our redesigned site.

This mobile-friendly site features a fresh design that’s easy to read on all your devices. So now you can follow middle-market M&A whether you’re in the office or on the go.

As before, expect brief, insight-packed posts on M&A news — plus enduring insights on successful growth through M&A.

The Successful Acquisitions Blog is a rich resource for any company owner or executive interested in new pathways to growth. So check out the site and let us know your thoughts!

Edelweiss Harrison brings over 15 years’ experience in senior-level consulting to enhance Capstone’s M&A services to middle market companies.

Capstone, a leading management consulting firm that helps middle market companies grow through M&A, announced today that Edelweiss Harrison has been promoted to Director of Strategic Growth.

She will lead Capstone’s strategic growth and market research projects for clients. Her primary focus will be on the first two phases of the company’s proprietary Roadmap to Acquisitions — “Build the Foundations” and “Build the Relationships.”

Edelweiss Harrison has over 15 years’ experience in guiding C-level executives through challenging strategic developments. She brings the added advantage of having worked in multiple manufacturing and services industries. Harrison is deeply immersed in the Capstone Roadmap methodology, having first joined Capstone in 1999 as a Research Assistant while studying at Georgetown University. For the last five years she has served as a Strategy Advisor in the firm.

During that time, Harrison advised medium and large clients on their domestic and international acquisition initiatives. She has conducted major research projects that follow Capstone’s demand-driven approach to M&A. She has also facilitated custom workshops for clients, evaluating opportunities and building growth plans based on objective data rather than subjective preference.

“We are pleased to have Edelweiss serving as Director of Strategic Growth. Her long history with Capstone and expertise in strategic consulting will further our commitment to helping clients grow through proactive growth programs,” said CEO David Braun.

Harrison’s strengths include her ability to build relationships of trust, based on candid communication and professional expertise. At the same time, she has exceptional analytic and project-management skills that ensure effective implementation. She says about her new role: “I enjoy helping clients clarify where they are today, define where they want to go and create an actionable plan for getting there.”

Originally from Brazil, Harrison is fluent in Portuguese and Spanish. She has extensive experience working with international markets including New Zealand, Australia, Spain, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East.

Harrison holds a Master of International Business from the University of Auckland and a Bachelor of Science from Georgetown University. She lives in Minneapolis with her husband, Craig, and their two sons.

About Capstone

Capstone Strategic is a management consulting firm located outside of Washington DC specializing in corporate growth strategies, primarily Mergers & Acquisitions for the middle market. Founded in 1995 by CEO David Braun, Capstone has facilitated over $1 billion of successful transactions in a wide variety of manufacturing and service industries. Capstone utilizes a proprietary process to provide tailored services to clients in a broad range of domestic and international markets. Learn more about Capstone at www.CapstoneStrategic.com.

 

Global dealmaking remains robust, reaching $2.2 trillion in the first half of 2015, according to Thomson Reuters data. This is an increase of nearly 40% from the first half of 2014 and the most active half since 2007. However, the number of deals only increased slightly, by 3%. The trend of fewer, larger transactions continues: mega deals accounted for 50% of M&A value in the first half. Average deal size increased by 34% when compared to 1H 2014.

M&A is strong due to favorable market conditions: abundant cheap financing, record stock prices, and renewed confidence in the economy. The U.S. market continues to drive global activity. U.S. transactions reached a record $1.02 trillion – the first time activity passed $1 trillion in a half-year period.

Check out our infographic for more:

M&A Update 1H 2015

 

There’s no denying it that M&A is on fire. Look at any financial newspaper headlines and you’ll see announced deals or merger talks. And keep in mind for all the major transactions involving publicly held companies there are many smaller, privately held transactions occurring unannounced.

We can better understand this current wave of activity and what it means for you if we review historical M&A.  Of two similar spikes in M&A, in 1998-2000 and 2005-2007, the first was primarily driven by Y2K and the dot-com era (or error, depending how you look at it!). This period, though it was marked by a significant burst in activity over a short time, was really an anomaly in the marketplace. It dropped off and certainly wasn’t helped by the events of 9/11.

US M&A activity from 1994 through  Q1 2015

We can better understand today’s robust M&A market by taking a look historical mergers and acquisitions.

M&A activity slowly ramped up until we reached the second peak in 2007 when inexpensive money was readily available. If you think back to 2007, there were a lot of similarities between corporate mortgages, corporate M&A, and the residential mortgage meltdown. The following years were slow for the economy and not surprisingly for acquisitions as well. M&A has a strong correlation to the equity market, although the equity market has done fantastically well since 2009 while M&A remained relatively flat until 2014, when we saw an uptick in activity.

Now there is pent-up demand for acquisitions and we’ll likely continue to see an increase in M&A activity throughout 2015.

Here are some trends to take note of today:

1. Mega deals, transactions over $5 billion, are now back in vogue.

Comparing this year to last, you’ll notice the number of deals has remained relatively flat while the dollar value of deals has increased significantly. In the U.S. for the month of May, the number of deals actually decreased from 939 in 2014 to 903 in 2015. However, the deal value increased to $261.2 million (according to FactSet Data)

2. Banks are more aggressive about lending.

With so much cash in the market, banks are now willing to take on more risk to secure more business. Banks are competing for attention from buyers and are offering attractive loan packages. We are starting to see more covenant-light transactions.

3. Companies still have record amounts of cash on their balance sheets.

Both individual companies and private equity firms now have readily available funds that can be used to pursue acquisitions.

With these ingredients in place, the M&A market remains robust.

What This Means for You

You may think that overall M&A market trends will not impact you, but I can tell you with a high degree of certainty that they will. Every industry will be affected, one way or another, because M&A is both a reflection and a source of business sentiment, and it influences market dynamics in multiple ways. You can be a passive observer or an informed observer. Or you may even choose to be an informed participant. Regardless, I encourage you to take stock of the fact that M&A is causing changes in your industry.  Deal-making may even accelerate in the next few months in industries such as telecommunications, healthcare, and oil and gas. Whether or not you choose to act, of course, is up to you.