Capstone announced today that Green Dot, a telecommunications provider headquartered in Trinidad and Tobago, has received regulatory approval to sell a 51% stake to One Caribbean Media. The acquisition allows Green Dot to continue reaching new markets and rapidly growing its subscriber base.

Capstone Strategic, Inc. (Capstone) announced today that Green Dot, Ltd. (Green Dot) has completed the sale of a 51% stake to One Caribbean Media Limited (OCM).

The transaction between Green Dot and OCM was first announced in August 2016 and closed after receiving expected regulatory approval. Capstone advised Green Dot on the agreement including facilitating discussions between Green Dot and OCM and providing negotiations assistance.

Green Dot is the leading ISP provider and third largest provider of digital television services in Trinidad and Tobago. Founded in 2004, the company provides wireless ISP and subscription TV services to residential and business customers in Trinidad and Tobago, Grenada, and Suriname. OCM is a regional media group quoted on the stock exchanges of Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados under the ticker symbol OCM.

The acquisition combines Green Dot’s leading telecommunication services and strong subscriber base with OCM’s resources to lead to a mutually beneficial deal.

CEO Ketan Patel will continue leading Green Dot and will leverage OCM’s marketing expertise to further expand into other countries in the Caribbean region. OCM’s investment is part of the firm’s diversification strategy.

“Our move to join forces with OCM will allow us to accelerate our mission to expand and grow in the Caribbean. Capstone served as an important advisor throughout the acquisition process and their expertise has been extremely helpful in bringing this deal to a successful close,” said Ketan Patel, CEO of Green Dot.

“We are delighted to see the acquisition between Green Dot and OCM come to fruition so that the two companies can continue providing superior internet, telecommunication, and entertainment services in the Caribbean. It has been a pleasure working with them and we are excited for their future growth,” said David Braun, CEO of Capstone.

About Capstone Strategic, Inc.

Capstone Strategic, Inc. is a management consulting firm located outside of Washington DC specializing in corporate growth strategies, primarily mergers and acquisitions for the middle market. Founded in 1995 by CEO David Braun, Capstone has facilitated over $1 billion of successful transactions in a wide variety of manufacturing and service industries. Capstone utilizes a proprietary process, “The Roadmap to Acquisitions,” to provide tailored services to clients in a broad range of domestic and international markets. Visit the Capstone website at http://www.CapstoneStrategic.com.

About Green Dot

Green Dot, Ltd. was founded in 2004 and has since become the leading innovator in telecommunication solutions. Headquartered in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago, the company offers wireless ISP and subscription TV services to residential and business customers in the Caribbean region. The Green Dot network has the capacity and capabilities to support today’s mission critical applications such as Virtual Private Networks, Voice and Video over IP, as well as bandwidth intensive applications such as Enterprise Resource Planning, Customer Relationship Management, and other Business to Business functions. Green Dot is committed to delivering world class solutions backed by unmatched customer support system. Visit the Green Dot website at: http://www.gd.tt.

 

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From the somewhat plausible to the downright outrageous, rumors abound whenever a transaction is announced. While some rumors may be innocuous, unfortunately others may have lasting, damaging effects on your company and employee morale so it’s important to quickly put a stop to them.

Here are three practical steps to kill gossip and reduce confusion.

1. Communicate Early

Of course the best way to stop rumors from spreading is to prevent them in the first place. On day one of the acquisition, publish and distribute your 100-Day Plan, your integration program for the newly merged company, so that employees understand what to expect including changes to benefits, payroll, and operations. No one likes being left in the dark and in an information vacuum people will likely imagine the worst. You don’t have to share every last detail of the deal, but you should let employees how they will be affected by the transaction.

2. Set up an Anonymous Hotline

A toll-free hotline or an online or physical question box, is a great way for employees to anonymously voice their frustrations, concerns, and questions without fear of repercussions. You’ll also be able to answer relevant questions rather than allowing employees to fill in the blanks on their own or through the grapevine.

3. Be Honest

Don’t lie. This simple principle most of us learn as children is vital to establishing and maintaining trust in a company. The truth will come out eventually and the consequences of lying will be worse than if you had told the truth in the first place. Although it might be bad news, it’s best to rip the band aid off quickly. We once had a buyer tell an entire plant they were losing their jobs because the buyer was shutting the factory down as a result of the acquisition. Of course people were upset, but they respect our client’s honesty and had ample time to plan next steps in their career rather than being blindsided.

Change is hard, but by communicating early, addressing questions, and remaining honest, you can prevent rumors from spreading after an acquisition.

For more advice on integration, download our special report “Planning for Integration – Begin at the Beginning.”

Many are convinced that the buyer with the most money always wins the deal. Although many acquisitions by financial acquirers and strategic buyers are driven by the desire to grow revenue and the company’s bottom line, it is possible to win an acquisition without offering the most amount of money.

A successful acquisition is about finding the right equation for the seller, which includes, of course, financial compensation, as well as many other non-financial aspects including prestige, value, excitement, or strategic fit.

It can be difficult to visualize this concept, so let’s take a look at a recent example from the news. Amazon announced it would acquire Souq.com a Dubai-based internet retailer. While terms of the deal were not disclosed, Amazon reportedly paid between $650-750 million, beating out a competing offer for $800 million from Emaar Mall. So why would Souq sell to Amazon for a lower price?

From Amazon’s perspective, this deal makes a lot of sense because it will allow Amazon to enter into the Middle East while circumventing regulatory hurdles, the headache of building new infrastructure, and the cost of raising brand awareness. Souq.com is already a very popular in the Middle East where e-commerce is expanding among a growing young, tech-savvy population. Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the UAE are the top markets for mobile penetration. In addition, Middle Easterners are willing to pay a 50-100% premium for Western products and brands from the US. The Souq acquisition will help with top-line and bottom-line growth.

So what’s in in for Souq? Why agree to a deal for less money?  The answer is Amazon’s experience and reputation. As one of the top global companies, Amazon has a large network, resources, and deep experience with e-commerce. Souq can leverage Amazon’s experience to continue growing.

It is also exciting to be acquired by a well-recognized brand and be a part of Amazon’s team. While we can’t know what the founder of Souq, Ronaldo Mouchawar, was thinking, we can safely assume emotion had some factor in the decision-making. Don’t completely forget about the human factor and emotions when it comes to M&A, especially when dealing with owners and privately-held businesses. In fact, understanding the owners motivations – excitement, family-members in the business, community pride, desire to leave a lasting legacy, risk aversion, or financial – is key to developing the right equation to persuade him or her to sell.

Photo Credit: Mike Mozart via Flickr cc

Think you can only acquire a for-sale company? Think again. Although it may seem impossible to buy a “not-for-sale” company, a company that is “not-for-sale” simply means it is not actively thinking about selling. However if the owner receives a compelling offer, they might change their mind. Here are four reasons why a not-for-sale acquisition can be better than a for-sale opportunity.

  1. Be proactive: Rather than reacting to whatever deals happen to come your way, you approach the prospects that offer the best fit with your company. This puts you in a better position for finding quality prospects that are aligned with your company.
  2. Maintain stealth in the marketplace: You can keep your acquisition search hidden from competitors. You also will gain access to acquisitions none of your competitors are aware of because the prospects you are looking at are not advertised. Another bonus: you can avoid auctions, which often drive up price,
  3. Maximize your options: If you only pursue for-sale acquisitions, you are ignoring a large number of profitable, viable acquisition prospects.
  4. Pick Winners: Companies that are not for sale are usually in good shape. Management teams are actively engaged in a successful business and are not looking for an exit. They may be happy to stay on (if you want them to) once the acquisition is complete.

As you begin your search for acquisition prospects, I encourage you to consider “not-for-sale” companies in addition to for-sale opportunities in order to increase your chances for a successful acquisition.

*A version of this post was originally published on AMA Playbook.

M&A activity has been trending upward in the last year and half to two years. There was a particular uplift in 2015 which reached the record-breaking value of $4.3 trillion worldwide. Some of that was fear-based because of what was going to happen with capital gain rates so many deals were completed in the latter half of 2015. Although activity dropped in 2016, it was still one of the most active years in the past ten years.

So far in 2017, average deal size is up and the number of deals is down for worldwide M&A activity. According to Reuters data, global M&A value reached $778 billion, increasing 12% while the number of deals decreased reached 11,441, a 9% decrease when compared to 1Q 2016. In the US deal value rose by 5% and the number of deals rose by 20%.

Middle Market Opportunity

Globally, bigger deals are back in vogue, and M&A is still being driven by strategic buyers rather than financial buyers. Large companies now have more confidence in deploying cash to execute these large transactions. However, not all of these large acquisitions will stick. There may be some “corporate indigestion” after taking such large bites and there will likely be some seeds and bones they will end up having to spit out in the form of spinoffs or divestments. That creates challenges and opportunities for the middle market companies who have the chance to fill some of those gaps.

M&A Outlook

In general from everything we are seeing right now, we expect activity will be robust for the next 12 months through the end of the 1Q 2018 , especially with the potential for tax reform related to repatriation of foreign cash. Leaders should anticipate a wave of activity from competitors, customers and suppliers and be prepared to handle changing industry dynamics. Strategic buyers should expect more competition from private equity groups as interest rates rise and PE groups become more active.

Click on the infographic for a closer look at M&A in the first quarter of 2017.

M&A Update 1Q 2017 - Capstone Strategic

Feature Photo Credit: Barn Images, Infographic by Capstone Strategic, Inc.

It seems like 2017 will be a strong year for acquisitions. A new report highlights a number of factors that could drive activity this year including the record levels of cash held by private equity firms and a favorable lending environment for borrowers.

Potential changes to U.S. tax policy under the new administration could reduce the corporate tax rate and encourage companies to repatriate offshore cash to invest in acquisitions.

2016 was a year full of uncertainty, from Brexit to the U.S. presidential elections, but as the economic and political landscape stabilizes, business leaders are regaining their confidence. 80% of executives surveyed predict M&A activity will increase in 2017. These market conditions may be the right recipe for increased acquisitions, especially for companies facing poor organic growth prospects.

In the first quarter alone, a number of significant transactions have been announced including the owner of Burger King and Tim Horton’s acquiring Popeyes, Mars acquiring pet hospital company VCA, and Intel pushing into the self-driving car space by purchasing Mobileye. These deals will likely spur additional acquisitions as key players react to changing industry dynamics and competition.

While we don’t know if M&A in 2017 will match 2015’s record level, we can certainly expect an uptick in activity for the remainder of the year.

Photo credit: Igor Trepeshchenok / Barn Images 

You do not need an M&A advisor to pursue acquisitions. You might think I’m crazy for saying this, after all, we are M&A advisors, but the truth is you can pursue acquisitions on your own. In fact, for those of you who are so inclined to take the do-it-yourself approach, I lay out a step-by-step process, the Roadmap to Acquisitions, in my book Successful Acquisitions and regularly provide tips and tricks for free on this blog and through my firm’s educational resource M&A U™.

That being said, there are many benefits to bringing on an experienced M&A advisor. Think of it this way: Technically, you do not need a CPA to do your taxes. Depending on your situation, you may be able to go through the paperwork, file your taxes on your own and hope you don’t get audited. Or, you could consult an experienced professional and rest easy, knowing the job will be done right.

The advantage of an M&A advisor is having an expert by your side for every step in the process. Unfortunately, especially if your company has never done an acquisition, it’s difficult to tell if you are missing any important steps until it’s too late. An experienced advisor will help you navigate the process and avoid making mistakes.

Here are five advantages of using a third party:

  1. Objective outsider to help evaluate decisions – Acquisitions can be emotional and as a third party, an M&A advisor can help facilitate discussions and resolve conflicting perspectives.
  2. Experienced market and company research team – In addition to accessing to multiple databases of industry information, a third party can speak directly to key industry players without giving away your interest in making an acquisition.
  3. Discreet approach to owners – One of the advantages of privately-held acquisitions is the ability to execute your strategy under the radar. An M&A advisor can approach companies – even competitors – on your behalf without exposing your plans to marketplace.
  4. Maintain negotiation momentum and overcome roadblocks – Negotiating during acquisitions is not about “winning,” it’s about understanding the motivators that will prompt an owner to sell. It takes experience to discover these underlying desires that will help move the deal forward.
  5. Ensure early preparation for success integration – When it comes to integration, experience has taught us that preparation begins very early in the process, well before the deal is consummated. With the help of an advisor, you can address integration issues early so that you successfully weather the challenging first 100 days of integration post-closing.

Does this sound familiar? You want to grow through acquisitions, but there are no good companies to acquire. While it may seem like there are absolutely zero acquisition prospects, usually that is not the case.

Many companies struggle to find acquisition prospects because they are focusing on only on industry partners, suppliers, or competitors they already have a relationship with. We call these companies the “usual suspects.” There’s nothing wrong with looking at the “usual suspects” for acquisition opportunities, but if you find you are hearing the same company names over and over again without getting any results, it may be time to try a new approach.

Here are four more ways to find quality acquisition prospects in addition the “usual suspects”:

  1. Market Research – In researching the market you will naturally uncover a few potential acquisition prospects. You will also have the advantage of gaining a deeper understanding of the market which will help you select the best companies to acquire, evaluate potential acquisition candidates, and negotiate with owners.
  2. Trade Shows / Associations – Both are an excellent source for finding many companies in your desired industry in a short amount of time. Walk the floor of a trade show and you’ll see dozens of companies all in one location and many trade associations also member companies listed on their website.
  3. Internal Input – Use the resources you already have. Your sales team is filled with folks who have their ear to the ground and are up-to-date on key players and new developments in the industry.
  4. For-sale Companies – Looking at for-sale companies is never a bad place to start your search. Just make sure you don’t limit yourself by only considering these opportunities. Including not-for-sale companies in your search will increase your chances for a successful acquisition. Remember, every company is for sale, for the right equation.

For more tips on finding companies to acquire join our webinar Building a Robust Pipeline of Acquisition Prospects on March 23.

After this webinar you will be able to:

  • Approach the search for the right acquisition prospect systematically
  • Understand effective research methods for identifying prospects
  • Develop criteria for your ideal acquisition prospect
  • Use tools for objective decision-making during the acquisition process

Building a Robust Pipeline of Acquisition Prospects

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Time: 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST

CPE credit is available.

Photo Credit: patchattack via Flickr cc

Should your credit union acquire a bank? If you are looking for new ways to grow, acquiring a bank may be an option for your credit union.

Capstone is excited to host a webinar attorney Michael Bell, who pioneered this new approach and continues to help credit unions acquire banks. The webinar will cover the strategy and mechanics behind a credit union-bank merger as well as challenges and proactive growth opportunities for credit unions.

Seizing Your Opportunity for Growth: Exploring the  Credit Union–Bank Merger Trend with Expert Michael Bell

Date: March 9, 2017

Time: 1:00 PM / 12:00 PM EST

Michael Bell is an attorney at Howard & Howard and a leading advisor to credit unions and national financial institutions seeking non-organic growth, strategic advice. In 2011, Michael completed the first ever purchase of a bank by a credit union. Michael continues advising credit unions in this area and has completed every credit union purchase of a bank to date. He is a “go-to” legal advisor in this area.

Founded in 1995, Capstone is a leading advisory firm focused on helping companies grow through proactive, strategic growth programs and mergers and acquisitions. As the leaders in strategic mergers and acquisitions for CUSOs, we have helped numerous credit union and CUSO leaders develop, evaluate, and implement initiatives for growth. Learn more at www.CapstoneStrategic.com.

Photo Credit: Ted Eytan via Flickr cc

Global M&A reached $3.7 trillion in 2016, dropping 16%, and the number of deals increased slightly by 1% when compared to last year. While 2016 did not match 2015’s record-levels, activity was still robust. Compared to 2014, activity increased by 5%.

Activity in the fourth quarter reached $1.2 trillion with 13,504 deals announced, a 50% increase in deal value and 18% increase in the number of deals when compared to 3Q 2016. This year, there were a number of interesting deals to note, including the AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner transactionVerizon’s deal with Yahoo, and GE Oil and Gas combining with Baker Hughes.

Click on the infographic for a closer look at M&A in 2016.

M&A Update Year End 2016 - Capstone Infographic

Happy New Year! We are excited to announce the 2017 webinar schedule and invite you to join us this year for these exciting events.

For over 20 years we have helped companies grow and educated business leaders on strategic growth through mergers and acquisitions. Each webinar is led by a seasoned M&A professional providing practical tools and tactics to accelerate your company’s growth. You can watch individual webinars or attend the entire program to earn the M&A U™ webinar certificate.

2017 Webinar Schedule

* Topics and dates subject to change
Photo Credit: Barn Images

The Street interviewed Capstone CEO David Braun for the article “Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Likes Sound of SpinMedia’s Music Brands.”

In the article David Braun analyzes the deal’s strategic rationale and discusses how traditional media businesses can continue to grow amidst a changing environment. As print media declines and digital media consumption rises, traditional publishing and communication companies must find new ways to stay relevant, capture market share and most importantly revenue.

Read the full article on The Street here: Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Likes Sound of SpinMedia’s Music Brands.”

When you think growing your business in 2017, you probably picture hiring more sales people, opening a new branch, developing additional products or acquiring state-of-the-art technology. Today I want to introduce a new concept for consideration: growing by exiting a business. Before you immediately dismiss the idea, take a moment to challenge your assumptions about company growth and allow yourself to be open to a new perspective. The reality is in some cases exiting may be the best path for growing your company.

Here are three ways exiting can help you grow.

  1. Get Focused – By exiting non-core business lines you can be focus on what you’re really good at. Take P&G for example. Over the last few years the company has adopted a strategic focus and shed over 105 brands in order to focus on 10 fast-growing categories. Shedding these non-core business lines will help P&G become more profitable. You may have some business lines you want to divest so that you can refocus your strategy and resources on what you truly excel at.
  2. Avoid Losses – If a part of your business is no longer profitable, you should evaluate whether or not you should keep going. Maintaining a business simply because you’ve always done so is not a good reason. The world changes and it may be that your customers no longer have a need for this product. For example, it would be crazy to continue manufacturing VCRs in today’s world.
  3. Grow Your Bottom Line – While overall sales or number of customers may shrink if you exit a market, your overall profit may grow. We once worked with an American manufacturer who made millions of die-casting products for various industrial customers. Unfortunately, many of their customers were purchasing cheaper products from China. Faced with this competition, our client decided to reinvent themselves into a maker of specialty components for the aerospace industry. They sold their old equipment and purchased the latest technology. As a result, their customer base shrunk tremendously, but profit rose.

When we hear the word “growth,” we automatically think about “more,” “bigger,” “expanding” not “less,” “smaller” or “shrinking.” While many would never consider exiting a business in order to grow, I encourage you to consider it as you develop your strategic growth plan.

Learn more about growing your business in our webinar 5 Options for Growth.

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2016 continued be a strategic, rather than a financial buyer’s market and strategic buyers deployed large cash reserves to pursue growth through M&A. Unlike financial buyers, which typically look for a three to five years return on investment, strategic buyers can afford to pay more due to their long-term focus.

The middle market has been eager to use M&A as a viable tool for growth. Despite a challenging economic environment, activity in the middle market remained stable in 2016, dropping only 3.5% in 3Q 2016.

As we close out 2016 and look forward to 2017, here is a roundup of the most popular posts of the year from the Successful Acquisitions blog.

  1. The Most Important Thing about M&A According to Warren Buffett
  2. 10 Signs You Should Walk Away from a Deal
  3. M&A Activity after the U.S. Election: Analysis and Outlook
  4. 7 Strategic Questions to Ask Before Pursuing Mergers & Acquisitions – New Webinar
  5. How to Avoid Irrational Decision-Making in M&A
  6. 5 Tips for Taking a Strategic Approach to M&A in 2016
  7. Is Middle Market M&A on the Rebound?
  8. Growth Through Acquisition – Exit Readiness Podcast Interview
  9. How to Break Bad News without Sinking Your Acquisition
  10. What Is Happening with Valuation Multiples Today?

Thank you for reading and we will see you all in 2017.

Photo Credit: Barn Images

2016 has been a year of surprises with the U.K. voting to leave the European Union, fears over China’s economic slowdown, oil price slumps, and Donald Trump winning the U.S. presidential election. Despite these shocks to the market, 2016 will likely be the third best year for global mergers and acquisitions in the past 10 years and dealmakers predict that 2017 will be even stronger.

2017 Outlook

There are many factors that may contribute to robust M&A activity next year. Capital remains available and cheap and in the latest Livingston Survey from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, economic forecasters have strengthened their outlook for the U.S. economic environment and their predictions for stock prices. The possibility of tax reform under the new presidential administration may also boost M&A activity. Most importantly, CEOs remain confident and willing to execute deals to grow their businesses.

Geopolitical upsets like Brexit and the outcome of the U.S. presidential elections may dampen activity as some may wait to see how these situations will affect their business and the marketplace. Changes in the interest rates may also reduce activity in some sectors, but create new opportunities in others such as financial services.

Top Sectors for 2017

Strong activity is expected in the following sectors:

  • Consumer product
  • Telecommunications, Media and Technology (TMT)
  • Industrials
  • Healthcare
  • Financial services
  • Oil and gas

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Are you exploring all your options for growth? When you think about a growing your credit union or CUSO through a “merger” strategy, you may be tempted to focus on consolidation alone. While combining two credit unions can be a pathway to growth, it is important to recognize it is just one of a number of options available to you. Consolidation may not be the best solution for your organization and may not help you add the value you had hope for.

In a CU Insight article, Kirk Drake, CEO of Ongoing Operations, a credit union service organization, and John Dearing, Managing Director of Capstone, discuss the growth options available to credit unions and CUSOs and how to use strategic mergers and acquisitions to maximize your growth potential.

Read the article on CU Insight.

As expected, Verso is consolidating locations and moving its headquarters from Tennessee to Ohio. Verso purchased NewPage Holdings for $1.4 billion in January 2014, but later filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. While Verso has emerged from bankruptcy, the company is not out of the woods yet.

“You’ve got a wounded company cutting staff, and that hurts morale,” says Capstone CEO David Braun in The Memphis Business Journal. David says Verso will have to do more than simply cut costs in order to be successful in the long-run. Read the full article here: Even after move, Verso will have more cuts to make

 

One month after the U.S. presidential election, there is still a great deal of speculation about what will happen in the M&A market over the next year. Looking back at M&A activity so far this year, compared to 2015 activity, fewer and smaller deals were announced. During the first 9 months of 2016, M&A value dropped by 30% to $1.07 trillion and average deal size dropped by 22% to $132 million. This year we have seen fewer huge, double-digit billion dollar transactions which dominated the marketplace in 2015.

Part of the reason is that historically, leading up to a presidential election where there will be a change of administration, there’s been hesitation in the marketplace. Business people don’t like uncertainty and as a result are less likely to take action.

The outcome of the election caught a number of people off guard, and we have already seen some impact in terms of some deals that are getting re-priced, accelerated or delayed in response. For example, in the healthcare space there’s uncertainty about how the Affordable Care Act will be impacted and we’re seeing a pullback in deals that touch upon it.

Despite this, over the next 24 months we expect an uptick in M&A. We’re already seeing a strong pipeline of deal activity as a result of the election being behind us. The business climate is still somewhat unsettled, but there’s a sense of relief the election is over.

Photo Credit: D Williams via Flickr public domain

When you acquire a company, the biggest risk you face in the unknown. You put a potentially large sum of money down for results that are not guaranteed. Whether you are acquiring a company for a new technological capability, to expand your geographic footprint, or for its complementary product line – there’s always the possibility that the transaction won’t yield the desired results or that it will cause problems and even hurt your company.

In the news we hear about bad acquisitions and there is an entire book, Deals from Hell, that recounts exactly what went wrong in many of these high profile transactions. Acquisitions are inherently more risky than hiring a new employee that you could fire if you find it is not working out. Once you acquire a company, it is yours, and you’re not going to be able to “fire” it.

If Acquisitions Are Risky, Why Acquire?

If acquisitions are so risky, then why do companies do them? If done right, acquisitions can bring about great rewards and next level growth to your company. M&A is inherently a high risk, high reward tactic, but you can take steps to reduce your level of risk by using a proven M&A process. A proven process will help you identify the right acquisition so you can maximize your opportunity for success.

The Roadmap to Acquisitions

Think back to the example of hiring a new employee. Your HR department probably has a manual with a process for job posting, interviewing, and onboarding employees in order to ensure they are a good fit at your company. As we mentioned earlier, although you expect results from your new employee, if you find it’s not working out, you can always let them go. Why wouldn’t you have a process for acquisitions as well?

The process we use is the Roadmap to Acquisitions, which we developed from over 20 years’ experience helping clients grow through acquisition. The Roadmap takes a holistic perspective on the acquisition process, beginning and initial strategy all the way through deal execution and integration planning. I highly suggest using an M&A process or having a strategic plan before you begin pursuing acquisitions. This will help your reap the rewards of M&A while reducing your exposure to risk.

Photo credit: Derek Gavey via Flickr cc

We generally recommend taking between 30 and 60 days to complete due diligence. We find this is enough time to complete a thorough evaluation of the business without letting the process drag on.

Due diligence will include onsite visits with your internal team and your external team of lawyers, accountants, and your third party M&A advisor. Your internal team should include more than just your CFO; we recommend involving your functional leaders from sales, marketing, and operations in this process because they will be in charge of running those functional areas once you complete the acquisition. Involve these functional leaders as early as possible so they can start learning about the business that’s being acquired and not only look for issues but also identify opportunities where you can realize the value of the acquisition.

In addition to onsite visits, you also have data requests that are sent out the acquisition prospect, asking for information about the company. We try to make this process a bit more interactive than a simple checklist by having a conversation around what is important to the business. Information is typically shared in a virtual data room which keeps the files secure and ensures only approved viewers access the documents.

One important thing to remember is that you can never completely eliminate risk, no matter how thorough you are during due diligence. We have a saying “Due diligence will go on forever…if you let it!” At some point you have to call the question and decide if you’ll pursue the deal or not. You’ll never uncover 100% of the issues during due diligence, but that’s why you have attorneys draft reps and warranties that can protect you if there are things found out after the deal. On the other hand, you’ll never uncover 100% (or any) of the opportunities by just evaluating the company. You will have to execute the acquisition in order to realize the benefits.

Photo credit: Craig Sunter via Flickr cc