You do not need an M&A advisor to pursue acquisitions. You might think I’m crazy for saying this, after all, we are M&A advisors, but the truth is you can pursue acquisitions on your own. In fact, for those of you who are so inclined to take the do-it-yourself approach, I lay out a step-by-step process, the Roadmap to Acquisitions, in my book Successful Acquisitions and regularly provide tips and tricks for free on this blog and through my firm’s educational resource M&A U™.

That being said, there are many benefits to bringing on an experienced M&A advisor. Think of it this way: Technically, you do not need a CPA to do your taxes. Depending on your situation, you may be able to go through the paperwork, file your taxes on your own and hope you don’t get audited. Or, you could consult an experienced professional and rest easy, knowing the job will be done right.

The advantage of an M&A advisor is having an expert by your side for every step in the process. Unfortunately, especially if your company has never done an acquisition, it’s difficult to tell if you are missing any important steps until it’s too late. An experienced advisor will help you navigate the process and avoid making mistakes.

Here are five advantages of using a third party:

  1. Objective outsider to help evaluate decisions – Acquisitions can be emotional and as a third party, an M&A advisor can help facilitate discussions and resolve conflicting perspectives.
  2. Experienced market and company research team – In addition to accessing to multiple databases of industry information, a third party can speak directly to key industry players without giving away your interest in making an acquisition.
  3. Discreet approach to owners – One of the advantages of privately-held acquisitions is the ability to execute your strategy under the radar. An M&A advisor can approach companies – even competitors – on your behalf without exposing your plans to marketplace.
  4. Maintain negotiation momentum and overcome roadblocks – Negotiating during acquisitions is not about “winning,” it’s about understanding the motivators that will prompt an owner to sell. It takes experience to discover these underlying desires that will help move the deal forward.
  5. Ensure early preparation for success integration – When it comes to integration, experience has taught us that preparation begins very early in the process, well before the deal is consummated. With the help of an advisor, you can address integration issues early so that you successfully weather the challenging first 100 days of integration post-closing.

Does this sound familiar? You want to grow through acquisitions, but there are no good companies to acquire. While it may seem like there are absolutely zero acquisition prospects, usually that is not the case.

Many companies struggle to find acquisition prospects because they are focusing on only on industry partners, suppliers, or competitors they already have a relationship with. We call these companies the “usual suspects.” There’s nothing wrong with looking at the “usual suspects” for acquisition opportunities, but if you find you are hearing the same company names over and over again without getting any results, it may be time to try a new approach.

Here are four more ways to find quality acquisition prospects in addition the “usual suspects”:

  1. Market Research – In researching the market you will naturally uncover a few potential acquisition prospects. You will also have the advantage of gaining a deeper understanding of the market which will help you select the best companies to acquire, evaluate potential acquisition candidates, and negotiate with owners.
  2. Trade Shows / Associations – Both are an excellent source for finding many companies in your desired industry in a short amount of time. Walk the floor of a trade show and you’ll see dozens of companies all in one location and many trade associations also member companies listed on their website.
  3. Internal Input – Use the resources you already have. Your sales team is filled with folks who have their ear to the ground and are up-to-date on key players and new developments in the industry.
  4. For-sale Companies – Looking at for-sale companies is never a bad place to start your search. Just make sure you don’t limit yourself by only considering these opportunities. Including not-for-sale companies in your search will increase your chances for a successful acquisition. Remember, every company is for sale, for the right equation.

For more tips on finding companies to acquire join our webinar Building a Robust Pipeline of Acquisition Prospects on March 23.

After this webinar you will be able to:

  • Approach the search for the right acquisition prospect systematically
  • Understand effective research methods for identifying prospects
  • Develop criteria for your ideal acquisition prospect
  • Use tools for objective decision-making during the acquisition process

Building a Robust Pipeline of Acquisition Prospects

Date: Thursday, March 23, 2017

Time: 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM EST

CPE credit is available.

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Not finding the right company to acquire is the top challenge for middle market companies seeking to grow through mergers and acquisitions. According to Capstone’s survey of middle market executives, 28% noted lack of suitable companies as the strongest reason for not considering acquisitions as a tool for growth.

Finding the right company to acquire is critical to the success of a deal, especially for strategic acquirers who plan to hold onto the newly acquired business long-term.

The lack of targets may be because most leaders are only focusing on for-sale companies. Many wrongly assume that if an owner is not actively seeking a buyer, a there is no chance for a deal. This is simply not the case. Once you begin to consider not-for-sale acquisitions, the universe of options expands.

Pursuing not for-sale acquisitions allows you to take charge of your acquisition strategy and seek out the best companies to acquire rather than accepting whatever opportunity happens to come your way.

For many I realize the idea of pursuing not-for-sale deals can be intimidating, and many assume that if an owner is not actively selling their company that there is no chance for acquisition. This is simply not true. While searching for and approaching companies that aren’t seeking buyers requires a different approach, and more effort, than reacting to whatever happens to be for sale, there are some tricks to approaching these owners.

Finding an Owner’s “Hot Buttons”

One of these best practices is to find the owner’s “hot buttons” to determine what the right equation will be for them to consider selling. A “hot button” is any issue an owner would insist on addressing if they were to sell the company. Price might be one such “hot button” but it’s unlikely to be the only one. The owner may love his or her work, in which holding a position after the acquisition would be a priority. There may be a succession issue if the owner has family members in the company they want to take care of. The owner could have longstanding ties to the community—or may even be the biggest employer in town—and would want to ensure the business stays in the area.

Being informed about these “hot button” issues, and handling them sensitively, opens up the whole field of so-called “not-for-sale” companies.  Now, as you develop your acquisition strategy, you have far more choices, and much better chance of finding the company that truly matches your over-riding strategic goal.

Because approaching “not-for-sale” owners takes great skill, it often it makes sense to hire a third party expert who has experience in this work and is not perceived as any kind of competitive threat by the owner.  Your acquisition advisor can also help you tease out the precise equation that would prompt the owner to sell.

For more insights on middle market M&A, download our report State of Middle Market M&A 2017.

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Capstone Strategic’s survey of middle market executives shows most see the same (43%) or growing (31%) M&A activity in their industry. 47% are pursuing M&A in order to access new markets.

Capstone Strategic, the leading M&A advisory firm for the middle market, surveyed middle market executives from multiple industries on their growth and M&A experience in 2016 and their outlook for 2017. The survey was conducted in December 2016 and followed previous annual surveys of the middle market.

M&A activity across the board is mostly seen as the same (43%) or growing (31%).

Looking forward, our respondents are evenly split on whether or not they will pursue M&A in 2017. 35% are less than 50% likely to execute acquisitions and 35% are more than 50% likely. The top driver for pursuing M&A this year is access to new markets (47%).

As for obstacles to M&A, time and attention demanded by the process is the top barrier to pursuing acquisitions in 2017 (25%) while the most common reason for not considering M&A as a tool for growth is lack of appropriate target companies (28%).

The overall growth picture is improving. Those reporting modest growth rose from 58% in 2015 to 67% in 2016 and those reporting high growth grew from 11% in 2015 to 13% in 2016. Those reporting contraction shrunk from 9% in 2015 to 5% in 2016.

The business environment is seen by most in a positive light, with the majority reporting the same (50%) or an improved (35%) environment for growth. Compared to 2015, fewer executives saw a worsening environment for growth (8% compared to 13%).

Capstone’s CEO David Braun said: “The survey confirmed that 2016 remained an active year for middle market mergers and acquisitions and looking ahead, we believe we’ll see begin to see a renewed interest in M&A activity due to pent up demand and supply in the marketplace. 2017 presents a unique opportunity for companies that decide to execute strategic acquisitions.”

The full survey, State of Middle Market M&A 2017, can be viewed by clicking here.

 Feature Photo credit: dan Chmill via Flickr cc

Should your credit union acquire a bank? If you are looking for new ways to grow, acquiring a bank may be an option for your credit union.

Capstone is excited to host a webinar attorney Michael Bell, who pioneered this new approach and continues to help credit unions acquire banks. The webinar will cover the strategy and mechanics behind a credit union-bank merger as well as challenges and proactive growth opportunities for credit unions.

Seizing Your Opportunity for Growth: Exploring the  Credit Union–Bank Merger Trend with Expert Michael Bell

Date: March 9, 2017

Time: 1:00 PM / 12:00 PM EST

Michael Bell is an attorney at Howard & Howard and a leading advisor to credit unions and national financial institutions seeking non-organic growth, strategic advice. In 2011, Michael completed the first ever purchase of a bank by a credit union. Michael continues advising credit unions in this area and has completed every credit union purchase of a bank to date. He is a “go-to” legal advisor in this area.

Founded in 1995, Capstone is a leading advisory firm focused on helping companies grow through proactive, strategic growth programs and mergers and acquisitions. As the leaders in strategic mergers and acquisitions for CUSOs, we have helped numerous credit union and CUSO leaders develop, evaluate, and implement initiatives for growth. Learn more at www.CapstoneStrategic.com.

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We usually think acquirers are big, multinational companies that gobble up their smaller competitors. However, that’s not always the case. Hudson’s Bay, which has a market value of $1.5 billion, is interested in acquiring Macy’s, which has a market value of $9.4 billion.

This transaction challenges common perceptions about acquirers and sellers and demonstrates that for the right strategic reasons, acquisition can be used as a growth tool by any company. While a smaller company acquiring a larger one is not the norm, it does happen. And, in this case, Hudson’s Bay could use Macy’s to expand its retail presence in the U.S. with another well-known department store. It would be difficult, if not impossible, for Hudson’s Bay to build up the reputation and name brand of Macy’s organically.

Hudson’s Bay, headquartered in Toronto, is an active acquirer and has a history of success in growing struggling retailers and optimizing value from its real estate. It acquired its affiliate Lord & Taylor in 2012 and Saks’s Fifth Avenue in for $2.4 billion in 2013. One year later, the Manhattan Saks Fifth Avenue store was valued at $3.7 billion. Hudson’s Bay has also made other acquisitions including German retailer Galeria Kaufhof for $2.8 billion in 2015 and Gilt Groupe for $250 million in 2016.

It will be interested to see how the transaction is structured and how Hudson’s Bay plans to tackle the challenges Macy’s is facing. Macy’s, like many traditional retailers, is struggling to keep up with market changes. The store is currently in the process of shutting down 100 stores and is planning to cut 10,000 jobs after facing disappointing fourth quarter sales. Perhaps an acquisition will save Macy’s? Only time will tell.

If you are thinking about growing your business, I encourage you to consider strategic acquisitions. Despite what you may think, there are many more options than just a large company acquiring 100% of a smaller company. I hope the example of Hudson’s Bay and Macy’s helps you gain a better understanding of what options might be available for you.

Learn more! Download the whitepaper Nine Pathways of External Growth.

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Thanks to advances in science and healthcare, people are living longer than ever. As they age, demand for healthcare products and services increases. One of the most significant demographic trends impacting healthcare is the aging baby boomer generation. As about 75 million American baby boomers grow older, demand for healthcare continue to will increase rapidly.

Today, companies are taking note of these market changes and using acquisitions to quickly capitalize on this opportunity for growth.

Just this week eyeglass giants Luxottica and Essilor announced a merger in order to take advantage of ideal market conditions. The acquisition will allow the company to benefit from strong demand in the eyeglass market that is only expected to grow.

In the heart disease sector, medical device companies are also acquiring in order to meet the growing needs of patients. Medtronic acquired HeartWare International for $1.1 billion, Teleflex acquired Vascular Solutions for $1 billion and Edwards Lifesciences acquired Valtech Cardio for $690 million. In this sector there is “huge unmet needs” according to Edwards Lifesciences CEO Michael Mussallem.

The primary driver of these acquisitions is swiftly meeting demand. Rather than waiting to build their own solutions, with acquisitions companies can rapidly take advantage of market conditions today and position themselves for future growth.

The ability to meet future demand is key to the success of any company. Take a look at your own industry and market. Where is demand going?

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Global M&A reached $3.7 trillion in 2016, dropping 16%, and the number of deals increased slightly by 1% when compared to last year. While 2016 did not match 2015’s record-levels, activity was still robust. Compared to 2014, activity increased by 5%.

Activity in the fourth quarter reached $1.2 trillion with 13,504 deals announced, a 50% increase in deal value and 18% increase in the number of deals when compared to 3Q 2016. This year, there were a number of interesting deals to note, including the AT&T’s acquisition of Time Warner transactionVerizon’s deal with Yahoo, and GE Oil and Gas combining with Baker Hughes.

Click on the infographic for a closer look at M&A in 2016.

M&A Update Year End 2016 - Capstone Infographic

Happy New Year! We are excited to announce the 2017 webinar schedule and invite you to join us this year for these exciting events.

For over 20 years we have helped companies grow and educated business leaders on strategic growth through mergers and acquisitions. Each webinar is led by a seasoned M&A professional providing practical tools and tactics to accelerate your company’s growth. You can watch individual webinars or attend the entire program to earn the M&A U™ webinar certificate.

2017 Webinar Schedule

* Topics and dates subject to change
Photo Credit: Barn Images

The Street interviewed Capstone CEO David Braun for the article “Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Likes Sound of SpinMedia’s Music Brands.”

In the article David Braun analyzes the deal’s strategic rationale and discusses how traditional media businesses can continue to grow amidst a changing environment. As print media declines and digital media consumption rises, traditional publishing and communication companies must find new ways to stay relevant, capture market share and most importantly revenue.

Read the full article on The Street here: Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Likes Sound of SpinMedia’s Music Brands.”

When you think growing your business in 2017, you probably picture hiring more sales people, opening a new branch, developing additional products or acquiring state-of-the-art technology. Today I want to introduce a new concept for consideration: growing by exiting a business. Before you immediately dismiss the idea, take a moment to challenge your assumptions about company growth and allow yourself to be open to a new perspective. The reality is in some cases exiting may be the best path for growing your company.

Here are three ways exiting can help you grow.

  1. Get Focused – By exiting non-core business lines you can be focus on what you’re really good at. Take P&G for example. Over the last few years the company has adopted a strategic focus and shed over 105 brands in order to focus on 10 fast-growing categories. Shedding these non-core business lines will help P&G become more profitable. You may have some business lines you want to divest so that you can refocus your strategy and resources on what you truly excel at.
  2. Avoid Losses – If a part of your business is no longer profitable, you should evaluate whether or not you should keep going. Maintaining a business simply because you’ve always done so is not a good reason. The world changes and it may be that your customers no longer have a need for this product. For example, it would be crazy to continue manufacturing VCRs in today’s world.
  3. Grow Your Bottom Line – While overall sales or number of customers may shrink if you exit a market, your overall profit may grow. We once worked with an American manufacturer who made millions of die-casting products for various industrial customers. Unfortunately, many of their customers were purchasing cheaper products from China. Faced with this competition, our client decided to reinvent themselves into a maker of specialty components for the aerospace industry. They sold their old equipment and purchased the latest technology. As a result, their customer base shrunk tremendously, but profit rose.

When we hear the word “growth,” we automatically think about “more,” “bigger,” “expanding” not “less,” “smaller” or “shrinking.” While many would never consider exiting a business in order to grow, I encourage you to consider it as you develop your strategic growth plan.

Learn more about growing your business in our webinar 5 Options for Growth.

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2016 continued be a strategic, rather than a financial buyer’s market and strategic buyers deployed large cash reserves to pursue growth through M&A. Unlike financial buyers, which typically look for a three to five years return on investment, strategic buyers can afford to pay more due to their long-term focus.

The middle market has been eager to use M&A as a viable tool for growth. Despite a challenging economic environment, activity in the middle market remained stable in 2016, dropping only 3.5% in 3Q 2016.

As we close out 2016 and look forward to 2017, here is a roundup of the most popular posts of the year from the Successful Acquisitions blog.

  1. The Most Important Thing about M&A According to Warren Buffett
  2. 10 Signs You Should Walk Away from a Deal
  3. M&A Activity after the U.S. Election: Analysis and Outlook
  4. 7 Strategic Questions to Ask Before Pursuing Mergers & Acquisitions – New Webinar
  5. How to Avoid Irrational Decision-Making in M&A
  6. 5 Tips for Taking a Strategic Approach to M&A in 2016
  7. Is Middle Market M&A on the Rebound?
  8. Growth Through Acquisition – Exit Readiness Podcast Interview
  9. How to Break Bad News without Sinking Your Acquisition
  10. What Is Happening with Valuation Multiples Today?

Thank you for reading and we will see you all in 2017.

Photo Credit: Barn Images

2016 has been a year of surprises with the U.K. voting to leave the European Union, fears over China’s economic slowdown, oil price slumps, and Donald Trump winning the U.S. presidential election. Despite these shocks to the market, 2016 will likely be the third best year for global mergers and acquisitions in the past 10 years and dealmakers predict that 2017 will be even stronger.

2017 Outlook

There are many factors that may contribute to robust M&A activity next year. Capital remains available and cheap and in the latest Livingston Survey from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, economic forecasters have strengthened their outlook for the U.S. economic environment and their predictions for stock prices. The possibility of tax reform under the new presidential administration may also boost M&A activity. Most importantly, CEOs remain confident and willing to execute deals to grow their businesses.

Geopolitical upsets like Brexit and the outcome of the U.S. presidential elections may dampen activity as some may wait to see how these situations will affect their business and the marketplace. Changes in the interest rates may also reduce activity in some sectors, but create new opportunities in others such as financial services.

Top Sectors for 2017

Strong activity is expected in the following sectors:

  • Consumer product
  • Telecommunications, Media and Technology (TMT)
  • Industrials
  • Healthcare
  • Financial services
  • Oil and gas

What Do You Think?

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Are you exploring all your options for growth? When you think about a growing your credit union or CUSO through a “merger” strategy, you may be tempted to focus on consolidation alone. While combining two credit unions can be a pathway to growth, it is important to recognize it is just one of a number of options available to you. Consolidation may not be the best solution for your organization and may not help you add the value you had hope for.

In a CU Insight article, Kirk Drake, CEO of Ongoing Operations, a credit union service organization, and John Dearing, Managing Director of Capstone, discuss the growth options available to credit unions and CUSOs and how to use strategic mergers and acquisitions to maximize your growth potential.

Read the article on CU Insight.

When you acquire a company, the biggest risk you face in the unknown. You put a potentially large sum of money down for results that are not guaranteed. Whether you are acquiring a company for a new technological capability, to expand your geographic footprint, or for its complementary product line – there’s always the possibility that the transaction won’t yield the desired results or that it will cause problems and even hurt your company.

In the news we hear about bad acquisitions and there is an entire book, Deals from Hell, that recounts exactly what went wrong in many of these high profile transactions. Acquisitions are inherently more risky than hiring a new employee that you could fire if you find it is not working out. Once you acquire a company, it is yours, and you’re not going to be able to “fire” it.

If Acquisitions Are Risky, Why Acquire?

If acquisitions are so risky, then why do companies do them? If done right, acquisitions can bring about great rewards and next level growth to your company. M&A is inherently a high risk, high reward tactic, but you can take steps to reduce your level of risk by using a proven M&A process. A proven process will help you identify the right acquisition so you can maximize your opportunity for success.

The Roadmap to Acquisitions

Think back to the example of hiring a new employee. Your HR department probably has a manual with a process for job posting, interviewing, and onboarding employees in order to ensure they are a good fit at your company. As we mentioned earlier, although you expect results from your new employee, if you find it’s not working out, you can always let them go. Why wouldn’t you have a process for acquisitions as well?

The process we use is the Roadmap to Acquisitions, which we developed from over 20 years’ experience helping clients grow through acquisition. The Roadmap takes a holistic perspective on the acquisition process, beginning and initial strategy all the way through deal execution and integration planning. I highly suggest using an M&A process or having a strategic plan before you begin pursuing acquisitions. This will help your reap the rewards of M&A while reducing your exposure to risk.

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Capstone Strategic announced today that Lintec USA Holding, Inc. has acquired VDI, LLC (DBA Vacuum Depositing). The acquisition brings together complementary technology and broad research and development capabilities that will allow for expansion in the industrial films market.

Capstone Strategic, Inc. (Capstone) announced today that Lintec USA Holding, Inc. (Lintec USA) has acquired VDI, LLC (VDI). Lintec USA will leverage VDI’s capabilities with its current assets to bolster its marketplace position. Capstone advised the acquirer on this transaction.

Lintec USA is a global leader in manufacturing and selling highly engineered, multilayer films for energy, automotive, safety, security, and architectural applications and the owner of Madico, Inc. (Madico), which manufactures window and specialty films. Lintec USA and Madico are owned by Lintec Corporation (Lintec), a publicly-held company traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Founded in 1971, VDI is headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky and is a custom roll-to-roll metallizer of evaporative, sputtered and dielectric coatings.

The acquisition will allow Lintec USA to accelerate its growth and strengthen its position in the industrial market by adding a complementary sputtering capability and a spectrally select product line. Lintec USA will also apply Lintec’s research and development, marketing, and distribution strengths to further expand VDI’s capabilities. The transaction is expected to benefit all parties as a result of leveraging VDI’s metalizing capability with parent company Lintec’s metalizing products.

Using our proprietary process, the Roadmap to Acquisitions, Capstone served as a third party M&A advisor and facilitated the acquisition between Lintec USA and VDI. Capstone guided Lintec USA through the process from initial strategy development to prospect identification and negotiations to papering and executing the deal.

“Throughout the acquisition process, the Capstone team was instrumental as our guide, sounding board, and stabilizing force as negotiations proceeded. We jointly developed our proactive growth through acquisition program and then Capstone approached owners and assisted as we prioritized candidates and resources. We leveraged Capstone’s focus and experience in the privately-held, not-for-sale acquisition world as we worked through the journey and ultimately attained our objective. I’m confident that the deal would not have been completed without their insight and involvement,” noted Paul Moynihan, CFO of Madico.

“Throughout every step of the process, Capstone worked diligently to address key challenges, and, most importantly, actively listened to uncover important issues on both sides. They certainly helped forge a positive relationship between our organizations and I’m excited about our opportunities to grow together in the future,” commented David Bryant, Owner and President of VDI.

“The team stayed true to the strategic external growth objectives established, and as a result of the acquisition, Lintec and Madico will glean benefits that will help them expand for years to come,” said Capstone Managing Director John Dearing.

Capstone Guides Acquisition of VDI by Japan's Lintec USA

About Capstone

Capstone Strategic, Inc. is a management consulting firm located outside of Washington DC specializing in corporate growth strategies, primarily mergers and acquisitions for the middle market. Founded in 1995 by CEO David Braun, Capstone has facilitated over $1 billion of successful transactions in a wide variety of manufacturing and service industries. Capstone utilizes a proprietary process, “The Roadmap to Acquisitions,” to provide tailored services to clients in a broad range of domestic and international markets. Learn more about Capstone online at http://www.CapstoneStrategic.com.

About Lintec USA and Madico

Lintec USA Holding, Inc. (Lintec USA) is a subsidiary of Lintec Corporation (Lintec), a publicly-held company traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange and a recognized technical leader in adhesive chemistries. Madico, Inc. (Madico), is owned by Lintec USA and is a global leader in the coating, laminating, and converting of flexible films in wide width, roll-to-roll format. Its products are multilayered, engineered films primarily targeting applications in Window Films and Specialty Films. For more information visit  http://www.madico.com.

About VDI, LLC.

Founded in 1971, VDI, LLC (VDI) is a custom roll-to-roll metallizer of evaporative, sputtered and dielectric coatings. Its primary business and production site is in Louisville Kentucky. The company is respected throughout the industry as a leader in both quality, innovation and customer service.

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We generally recommend taking between 30 and 60 days to complete due diligence. We find this is enough time to complete a thorough evaluation of the business without letting the process drag on.

Due diligence will include onsite visits with your internal team and your external team of lawyers, accountants, and your third party M&A advisor. Your internal team should include more than just your CFO; we recommend involving your functional leaders from sales, marketing, and operations in this process because they will be in charge of running those functional areas once you complete the acquisition. Involve these functional leaders as early as possible so they can start learning about the business that’s being acquired and not only look for issues but also identify opportunities where you can realize the value of the acquisition.

In addition to onsite visits, you also have data requests that are sent out the acquisition prospect, asking for information about the company. We try to make this process a bit more interactive than a simple checklist by having a conversation around what is important to the business. Information is typically shared in a virtual data room which keeps the files secure and ensures only approved viewers access the documents.

One important thing to remember is that you can never completely eliminate risk, no matter how thorough you are during due diligence. We have a saying “Due diligence will go on forever…if you let it!” At some point you have to call the question and decide if you’ll pursue the deal or not. You’ll never uncover 100% of the issues during due diligence, but that’s why you have attorneys draft reps and warranties that can protect you if there are things found out after the deal. On the other hand, you’ll never uncover 100% (or any) of the opportunities by just evaluating the company. You will have to execute the acquisition in order to realize the benefits.

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Seeking growth amid a shifting telecommunications industry, AT&T has bet on media content. The company plans to acquire Time Warner for $85 billion in one of the biggest media acquisitions in history. The transaction will likely take over a year to receive regulatory approval, but both AT&T and Time Warner executives are optimistic. AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson has compared the deal to Comcast’s acquisition of NBC Universal in 2013, which was approved after a long period of regulatory scrutiny. This vertical merger will bring together Time Warner’s media content and AT&T’s distribution network in one company.

Consumers Dropping Landlines, Cable TV

The telecommunications market has shifted with many consumers dropping landlines and cable TV. Mobile use is increasing exponentially with mobile users representing 65% of digital media time in 2015. This means people are primarily using smartphones to read articles, play games and watch videos than are using computers.

Telecommunications and media companies are starting to take notice of these trends. Just last year AT&T’s biggest rival, Verizon, acquired AOL in a push to reach more mobile users. And earlier this year, it announced it would acquire Yahoo to boost its mobile unit.

Deal Synergies

One benefit of the deal is that AT&T will be able to provide more data to Time Warner and advertisers without raising prices for consumers or withholding the content from competitors (like Verizon).

AT&T may also plan to create original, exclusive content leveraging Time Warner’s expertise in media. Online streaming services such as Netflix and Amazon have successfully produced their own original content.

In the long term, AT&T wants to build up a robust, next-generation infrastructure in order to compete with cable providers. “I will be sorely disappointed if we are not going head-to-head” with cable providers by 2021, said Stephenson.

Growing in a Declining Market

As demand for traditional telecommunication services shrinks, AT&T and other providers must look outside their current market for new growth opportunities. In a declining marketing, consolidating, or simply gaining more market share will not help you grow in the long term. If AT&T managed to capture the entire market for landline phones, their revenues would still shrink as consumers abandon landlines.

By acquiring Time Warner, AT&T will own content including popular networks such as HBO and CNN. Organically growing its own content business would take time and be difficult given the large size of other media content producers like Disney and CBS. As an established business, Time Warner gives AT&T a foothold in the media market and immediate access to new users.

If like A&T you are stuck in a declining marketing, identifying markets with future demand for your company’s products or services is the key to growth. You can explore future demand by using our tool, the Opportunity Matrix, to understand where you want to position your company strategically looking forward.

Start exploring today 

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Capstone announced today that Citizens Energy Group through its subsidiary Kinetrex Energy Exploration & Production, has acquired a 50% working interest in oil assets in Knox County, Indiana from Trey Exploration.

Capstone Strategic, Inc. (Capstone) announced today that Kinetrex Energy Exploration & Production (KEEP), a subsidiary of Citizens Energy Group (Citizens), has acquired a 50% stake in oil producing assets in Knox County, Indiana from Trey Exploration, Inc. (TEI). Capstone advised KEEP on the transaction.

KEEP is a subsidiary of Citizens focused on the exploration and production of oil. Founded in 1887 as a public charitable trust, Citizens is a broad-based utility service company providing natural gas, thermal energy, water and wastewater services to about 800,000 people and thousands of businesses in the Indianapolis area.

TEI primarily engages in the exploration and production of oil and gas resources in the Illinois Basin and other hydrocarbon producing areas across the United States. The company has also conducted geological studies in areas across the United States and in international markets. TEI was founded in 1987 by Howard A. Nevins. The company provides the highest standards of conduct and is environmentally responsible.

Capstone assisted in structuring a deal to establish a long-term partnership between KEEP and TEI. Both companies will use their complementary skills to increase production by using enhanced oil recovery techniques, drilling additional wells, and by exploring deeper geological formations. KEEP will provide additional geological studies while TEI will continue to operate the property.

“As a third party advisor, Capstone’s expertise was critical in identifying the opportunity and providing deal advisory, valuation and negotiation assistance to help finalize the investment. We are pleased to begin working with TEI today and for many years to come,” said Aaron Johnson, President of KEEP.

“We are excited to bring together two companies with this partnership. KEEP’s investment in Knox County and partnership with TEI will allow Citizens to reinvest more of its oil and gas profits into providing unparalleled utility services to consumers for many years to come.” said Capstone Managing Director John Dearing.

Capstone Advises Kinetrex Energy Exploration & Production in Acquiring Oil Assets in Knox County, Indiana from Trey Exploration

About Capstone Strategic

Capstone Strategic, Inc. is a management consulting firm located outside of Washington DC specializing in corporate growth strategies, primarily mergers and acquisitions for the middle market. Founded in 1995 by CEO David Braun, Capstone has facilitated over $1 billion of successful transactions in a wide variety of manufacturing and service industries. Capstone utilizes a proprietary process, “The Roadmap to Acquisitions,” to provide tailored services to clients in a broad range of domestic and international markets. Learn more about Capstone online at www.CapstoneStrategic.comTwitter LinkedIn.

About Citizens Energy Group

Citizens Energy Group provides safe and reliable utility services to about 800,000 people in Indianapolis. Citizens operates its utilities only for the benefit of customers and the community. Kinetrex Energy Exploration & Production is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Citizens. Additional information is available online at www.CitizensEnergyGroup.com – Facebook – Twitter – YouTube.

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Ford announced it would acquire Chariot, a shuttle-van startup based in San Francisco, in order to expand beyond auto manufacturing and become a mobility company. This is the first acquisition by Ford Smart Mobility, which was established in March of 2016 in order to focus on “emerging mobility services.” Ford reportedly paid $65 million for Chariot.

Chariot uses 100 Ford Transit vans to offer rides to commuters along 28 routes in the San Francisco Bay Area. After the acquisition, Chariot will leverage Ford’s expertise in logistics and vehicle operations as well as use data algorithms to schedule trips in real time. Together Chariot and Ford plan to expand to at least five more markets. Ford already has shuttle programs in Kansas City, Missouri, and Dearborn Michigan. Ford intends to focus on other forms of transportation including bikes, dynamic shuttles and more, according to Jim Hackett, the chairman of Ford Smart Mobility.

Ford will also partner with Motivate to expand a bike sharing program in the Bay Area. Through the partnership, the program will grow to from 700 to 7,000 bikes and be renamed Ford GoBike.

Auto Manufacturing in Decline

To put it nicely, the outlook for auto manufacturing is pretty bleak. Competitors like Zipcar, Uber and Lyft and new technologies have disrupted the traditional automotive industry. Consumers today are buying fewer cars and option for public transportation or car sharing instead. The trend is not limited to millennials, in fact, according to a study published by University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute, fewer middle-aged adults in their 30s and 40s had driver’s licenses in 2014 than did in 1983. Ford is by no means the only car manufacturer to see that its market is shrinking. Earlier this year GM invested $500 million in Lyft to invest in self-driving car partnership.

How to Grow in a Shrinking Market

What’s your market outlook? While your business may be profitable today, if you’re in a shrinking market, future growth will be challenging. Faced with a declining market, now is the time to consider your options and next steps to ensure long term growth. You made focus on building your own solution organically or you may decide to partner with another company to rapidly gain access to a new market. In the case of Ford, the acquisition will allow the company to rapidly gain a foothold in the growing market of ride-sharing and alternate means of transportation.

Photo Credit: Mike Mozart via Flickr cc