M&A 2009: A Book In The Works

 

If you want to read a decent book on M&A, be prepared to spend $70 or $80, and set aside several days to plough through a heavy-duty tome for business students. There are exceptions, but for the average business reader there’s remarkably little to guide you through our world of deals.

 

So I’m writing a book. And it won’t be 500 pages long, or cost $70! The working title is “A CEO’s Guide To M&A” and its really for the kind of people I do business with — leaders of substantial companies and divisions in the mid-market sector. 

 

M&A has a peculiar aura in the business world. On the one hand, there’s the fascination of massive corporations eating each other alive. On the other hand, there’s all that dreary academic literature. The subject seems simultaneously glamorous and impenetrably dull. 

 

In reality, most acquisitions are not multinational mega-deals. Every year, hundreds of transactions are consummated between companies below the $1 billion revenue level, the majority privately owned. You will rarely read about these deals in the business press, and by definition a private transaction yields less public information. Yet this activity is absolutely essential to a healthy economy. 

 

One thing I’ll be emphasizing in my book:  the true function of an acquisition is not just growth, but recalibration. Buying another company will change yours, for better or worse depending on how strategic your approach. By the same token, M&A as a whole serves to recalibrate entire industries. It’s one of the market’s most effective mechanisms for self-correction and positive evolution.

 

That’s why I’m hoping my work will interest the general reader, as well as CEOs. The better you understand acquisitions, the better you understand business itself.

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